Week-15-Contextual Research

This week I watched a film on the Cubism of Picasso and Braque. I find Picasso to be an artist whose mind I like more than his art. I enjoy cubism, but never felt that his art was classified correctly, as there are little to no ‘cubes’ in his work.

I was doing bit of research on papier colle, which is a type of collage that both Braque and Picasso produced.  What interested me is the use of stenciled words on the pantings. I have decided to have information out of my images for my FMP, unless of course I can find an artist who does it well enough for me to consider writing on or in my images.

The name of the documentary is: Willian S. Rubin on Picasso and Braque: Pioneering Cubism.  It comes free with my Amazon Prime membership. I like painting myself, and always find the ideas of painters useful to me as a photographer, because they are dealing with one image at a time, as opposed to photographers who have to produce a series of works, and thus tend to give very accurate and appropriate descriptions or titles to their works.

William S Rubin is the narrator.  He states that Cubism is a misnomer. He comes from a more informed position than I do, and says the reason is:  “it gives the impression that the style is, first of all, more geometric than it really is, and there are in fact no cubes in cubism.”  Cubism also suggests volume and dimentinality, which is what both Braque and Picasso were attempting to remove from painting.

I some respects, the images I am constructing for my FMP, are also having their perspective removed by my double exposing in camera images and or compositing them in photoshop. Using this technique, I find that the images are also being brought to the foreground, with very little, to no depth perspective in the images

 

I love flat space, and try as much as I can to avoid depth cues and perspective as much as possible for my FMP. With the little time that I have left to photograph, I may consider using parts of words, titles or numbers embedded in the image much like Braque and Picasso both did [they used parts of words and parts of names in their papier colle’s] I find this very attractive.

Fig. 1 Papier Colle’s Series Bouteille de Rhum Pailee, 1966 by Picasso.
Fig.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

Amazon.com  William-Rubin-Picasso-Braque-Pionering

Fig.1  https://www.kingandmcgaw.com/prints/pablo-picasso/papiers-colles-series-bouteille-de-rhum-paillee-verre-et-le-journal-1966-435917#435917::frame:880604_glass:770007_media:0_mount:108652_mount-width:20

Fig.2  https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/papier-colle

 

 

 

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